The acclaimed American author, Bruce Sterling launched an interactive electronic kinetic artwork entitled “Tribute to Nelly Ben Hayoun.” at this year’s Share Festival in Turin. You can find out more about this unique piece dedicated to Nelly in his humorous take on the Festival  and his artwork – ‘The Tools and the Tribute by Bruce  Sterling’.  Thank you Bruce!

For the full article follow the link Words by Bruce Sterling

“Tribute to Nelly Ben Hayoun”  should be properly classified as an Internet-of-Things artwork. It’s a work of kinetic art, a “mobile” in the useless-machine tradition of Alexander Calder and Bruno Munari. However, it’s also networked, for it has a wireless IoT device attached to its structure, an Internet-enabled element called the “Social Media Fan.”

This digitized, battery-driven fan briefly blows a gust of air whenever Nelly Ben Hayoun is noticed on Twitter. So the mobile sculpture operates as an ambient-computing indicator of Nelly’s social-media fame. “Tribute to Nelly Ben Hayoun” is a mobile designed to move, not with the wind, but with the public’s tributes, the fitful breezes of a designer’s fame.

That artful description sounds rather better than the art-machine itself actually performs. If the Nelly Ben Hayoun mobile has a virtue, it’s that it is approachable. Its physical structure is lucid and simple. Probably a ten-year-old kid could build one, if he took a programming class.

To create this work, I began by exclusively using only the hand-tools contained in the Artmaker Bag. I spent a lot of interesting time hand-messing with plexiglass. Clear plastics are pretty common in device art, and I like the idea of translucency, transparency and refraction in a kinetic mobile. The material substance of “Tribute to Nelly Ben Hayoun” is almost all translucent: it’s plastic and faceted glass junk-crystal.

For the full article follow the link Words by Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling is a futurist, journalist, science-fiction author and design critic, Bruce Sterling is best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre.

His nonfiction works include The Hacker Crackdown: Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier; Tomorrow Now: Envisioning the Next Fifty Years; and Shaping Things. He is a contributing editor of Wired magazine, for which he writes on a wide range of topics, including politics, globalization and offshoring, technology and security, and the potential of NGOs. He also writes a weblog. During 2005, Sterling was the “visionary in residence” at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. In 2008, he was the guest curator for the Share Festival of Digital Art and Culture in Torino, Italy, as well as the visionary in residence at the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam. In 2011, he returned to Art Center as visionary in residence to run a special project on augmented reality. Bruce Sterling has appeared on Nightline, The Late Show, Morningside, MTV, and TechTV and in Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Fortune, Nature, I.D., Metropolis, Technology Review, Der Spiegel, La Stampa, La Repubblica, and many other venues.